10 Things I’ve Learned After 6 Months of Living in Seattle - DBK Photography

10 Things I’ve Learned After 6 Months of Living in Seattle

10 Things I’ve Learned After 6 Months of Living in Seattle

You can never trust the weather. Sometimes I’ll check to see what the weather will be like over the weekend. On Monday, it’ll say clear skies. Tuesday, it’ll say 20% chance of rain. Wednesday, it’ll say 90% chance of rain. Thursday it’ll say 20% again. Friday it’ll fake you out and say 10% chance of spotted showers. And by Saturday it’s actually 100% raining. I’ve given up trying to plan ahead.

Things you learn after living in Seattle

It is entirely possible for you to need lights on all day. I used to think an overcast day just meant you couldn’t directly see the sun. Overcast in New Mexico still requires you to wear sunglasses. But the thick layers of clouds that can blanket the skies here are no joke, and if it’s raining at noon, you just might need your headlights on.

Rain gear is a necessity. This one might seem obvious. Duh, it rains in Seattle. But when you come from the desert it’s hard to grasp just how much it is actually possible to rain. I bought rain boots and a rain jacket at the beginning of the fall and I have worn little else in terms of outerwear since.

Rain jacket, rain boots, living in the PNW

Also, apparently umbrellas are lame. But now that I have a jacket and boots suited for the rain I have had no need for one, so there you go.

Seahawks gear is practically a required uniform for Seattle-area residents. Every time I go to the grocery store, I notice that all of the employees, along with at least half the shoppers, are wearing Seahawks jerseys and sweatshirts. When I make it into a Starbuck’s, it’s the same. Go to a brewery for dinner, you’ll see it. Likewise, the whole city likes to stay decked out with Seahawks flags and blue and green lights. I don’t know if it’s like this any place with a professional team—but Seattle is crazy for their Seahawks.

Number 12 in Seattle skyline.

Autumn lasts longer up here, and it is glorious. You start to see colors popping up in September, and they stick around until nearly Thanksgiving, depending on where you are in the area. I can’t get enough of the flashes of yellow and red among the evergreen trees that cover the foggy hills. It’s a totally different look from the flaming yellow cottonwoods that line the bosque for two weeks in Albuquerque, but I love it just as much.

Autumn leaves through the evergreens in the PNW

The grass stays green all year long. Benefits to it being so wet, and not getting all too cold in the winter: the grass doesn’t die come November. Usually one of my least favorite things about winter is how dead it can make everything look, but with the lasting plush grass, the moss covering the bare branches, and all the evergreens, you could almost forget that it’s wintertime here, especially if the sun is out.

A sunny day is like crack to PNWers. Anytime the sun decides to make an appearance, everyone dashes outside to soak it in. While you get used to going outdoors and adventuring in the rain around here, when it’s a sunny day you can’t pass up the opportunity to camp, hike, bike, or swim. The parks and trails fill up on nice days, and in the summer, forget about it. Also, when it’s sunny, it will be all everyone can talk about. “What a beautiful day—enjoy it while it lasts!”

Sunny days in Seattle

There is so much to do. I’ll admit that I took for granted all that New Mexico had to offer for sightseeing and outdoorsy fun. But the PNW is in a league of its own. Of course, there is the bustle of the city. Head farther west for a couple hours and you’ll reach the coast. A couple hours south is Portland, near the Columbia River Gorge and not far from the gorgeous Oregon Coast. Two to three hours north will find you in Canada. And less than an hour east and you’re exploring the forest passes and quaint small towns. There are parks and lakes and forests everywhere. I love sharing my PNW Adventures on the blog every now and then because it’s such great fun to take a road trip and be a tourist in a new place every weekend. I’m constantly adding new places to my list of PNW wanderlust every time I scroll through Instagram.

Looking over Rattlesnake Ledge

The photography community is huge, talented, inspiring, and it’s been a blessing to get to meet some of them. The first thing I did when I knew we were going to be moving to Seattle was begin to search for fellow photographers in the area who I might reach out to. The sheer volume of photographers in the greater Seattle area, and their obvious talent, overwhelmed me. How would I stand out? Why would they want to get to know me at all? But after stepping out of my comfort zone and making some contacts, I realize that we are all people, and we are all able to help each other, and it would be a lonely business if we all didn’t attempt to be friends with one another. Getting to know photographers like Agnieszka, Aimee, and Jeanne has warmed my heart.

Seattle skyline from Queen Anne

Now let’s see what the next 6 months will bring. I’m looking forward to it!

xoxo

You can never trust the weather. Sometimes I’ll check to see what the weather will be like over the weekend. On Monday, it’ll say clear skies. Tuesday, it’ll say 20% chance of rain. Wednesday, it’ll say 90% chance of rain. Thursday it’ll say 20% again. Friday it’ll fake you out and say 10% chance of spotted showers. And by Saturday it’s actually 100% raining. I’ve given up trying to plan ahead.

Things you learn after living in Seattle

It is entirely possible for you to need lights on all day. I used to think an overcast day just meant you couldn’t directly see the sun. Overcast in New Mexico still requires you to wear sunglasses. But the thick layers of clouds that can blanket the skies here are no joke, and if it’s raining at noon, you just might need your headlights on.

Rain gear is a necessity. This one might seem obvious. Duh, it rains in Seattle. But when you come from the desert it’s hard to grasp just how much it is actually possible to rain. I bought rain boots and a rain jacket at the beginning of the fall and I have worn little else in terms of outerwear since.

Rain jacket, rain boots, living in the PNW

Also, apparently umbrellas are lame. But now that I have a jacket and boots suited for the rain I have had no need for one, so there you go.

Seahawks gear is practically a required uniform for Seattle-area residents. Every time I go to the grocery store, I notice that all of the employees, along with at least half the shoppers, are wearing Seahawks jerseys and sweatshirts. When I make it into a Starbuck’s, it’s the same. Go to a brewery for dinner, you’ll see it. Likewise, the whole city likes to stay decked out with Seahawks flags and blue and green lights. I don’t know if it’s like this any place with a professional team—but Seattle is crazy for their Seahawks.

Number 12 in Seattle skyline.

Autumn lasts longer up here, and it is glorious. You start to see colors popping up in September, and they stick around until nearly Thanksgiving, depending on where you are in the area. I can’t get enough of the flashes of yellow and red among the evergreen trees that cover the foggy hills. It’s a totally different look from the flaming yellow cottonwoods that line the bosque for two weeks in Albuquerque, but I love it just as much.

Autumn leaves through the evergreens in the PNW

The grass stays green all year long. Benefits to it being so wet, and not getting all too cold in the winter: the grass doesn’t die come November. Usually one of my least favorite things about winter is how dead it can make everything look, but with the lasting plush grass, the moss covering the bare branches, and all the evergreens, you could almost forget that it’s wintertime here, especially if the sun is out.

A sunny day is like crack to PNWers. Anytime the sun decides to make an appearance, everyone dashes outside to soak it in. While you get used to going outdoors and adventuring in the rain around here, when it’s a sunny day you can’t pass up the opportunity to camp, hike, bike, or swim. The parks and trails fill up on nice days, and in the summer, forget about it. Also, when it’s sunny, it will be all everyone can talk about. “What a beautiful day—enjoy it while it lasts!”

Sunny days in Seattle

There is so much to do. I’ll admit that I took for granted all that New Mexico had to offer for sightseeing and outdoorsy fun. But the PNW is in a league of its own. Of course, there is the bustle of the city. Head farther west for a couple hours and you’ll reach the coast. A couple hours south is Portland, near the Columbia River Gorge and not far from the gorgeous Oregon Coast. Two to three hours north will find you in Canada. And less than an hour east and you’re exploring the forest passes and quaint small towns. There are parks and lakes and forests everywhere. I love sharing my PNW Adventures on the blog every now and then because it’s such great fun to take a road trip and be a tourist in a new place every weekend. I’m constantly adding new places to my list of PNW wanderlust every time I scroll through Instagram.

Looking over Rattlesnake Ledge

The photography community is huge, talented, inspiring, and it’s been a blessing to get to meet some of them. The first thing I did when I knew we were going to be moving to Seattle was begin to search for fellow photographers in the area who I might reach out to. The sheer volume of photographers in the greater Seattle area, and their obvious talent, overwhelmed me. How would I stand out? Why would they want to get to know me at all? But after stepping out of my comfort zone and making some contacts, I realize that we are all people, and we are all able to help each other, and it would be a lonely business if we all didn’t attempt to be friends with one another. Getting to know photographers like Agnieszka, Aimee, and Jeanne has warmed my heart.

Seattle skyline from Queen Anne

Now let’s see what the next 6 months will bring. I’m looking forward to it!

xoxo

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